East Coast Parallels

This weekend, I flew home to Connecticut for my high school best friend's wedding. Perhaps I run in particularly Democratic circles, but everyone I spoke to was eager to hear about my work on the California governor's race.

Pro-Jerry sentiment was rampant among friends, family, even acquaintances. (Remember, Connecticut was among the states Jerry picked up during the 1992 presidential primaries.)

The bride's father, a probate judge active in his local Democratic party, has never set foot in California and yet told me he was so proud to hear about the good work I'm doing for the state. "We're all rooting for you out here," his wife added. Even the security checkpoint woman at Bradley Airport saw the Jerry sticker on my laptop and crowed, "Jerry Brown! Now that's an oldie but goodie," before wishing me best of luck on the campaign.

Perhaps the Constitution State folk are so fixated on the California race because of events happening close to home.

Current, popular Attorney General Dick Blumenthal is running a tight race for Chris Dodd's open senate seat against Linda McMahon, the multi-millionaire former CEO of World Wrestling Entertainment who has no prior political experience.

Sound familiar?

Shortly after her primary win, McMahon pledged to spend as much as it takes to win, stating that "money is no object." Forecasters predict she will pump close to $30 million into her campaign - peanuts compared to eMeg's figures, but one of the most expensive races this election season nonetheless.

Residents in my home state seem as disenchanted about buying elected office as our peers here on the left coast. If my conversations over the weekend are any indication, voters from both sides of the country will come out on November 2 in an effort to elect the most qualified, not the most affluent, candidates.

 

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